Licorice Root

Licorice Root

Southern European civilizations have conventionally utilized licorice root to remedy gentle lung situations like bronchitis. The supplement contains demulcent as well as expectorant assets, making it helpful as cough syrup. Licorice root can as well strengthen the immune system and assist the body in combating cancer. Since conducted studies showed that licorice root can also instigate superfluous side effects, particularly if utilized recurrently, you must not utilize this herb until additional examination is performed.

Herbs that Stimulate HGH

Astragalus_glycyphyllos_fruitYellow Leader【植】黄芪属;

 

The herb Astragalus membranaceus also known as yellow leader is a perpetual plant significant to Chinese Conventional medicine. Individuals utilize this supplement as a broad stimulant containing constructive parts in aging, immunity, and absorption. Scientist examined the probable capacity of yellow leader to intensify growth hormone and these scientists discovered four lively components from the herb. The substances were examined on the pituitary glands of rats stayed in culture. The statistics demonstrated that every chemical accelerated the discharge of growth hormone. In view of that, the findings recommend that yellow leader might intensify growth hormones in humans as well. But, outcomes achieved in animal examinations do not essentially take a broad view, and the enduring security of yellow leader stays uncertain.

Astragalus is a large genus of about 3,000 species of herbs and small shrubs, belonging to the legume family Fabaceae and the subfamily Faboideae. It is the largest genus of plants in terms of described species.[1] The genus is native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Common names include milkvetch (most species), locoweed (in North America, some species)[2] and goat’s-thorn (A. gummifer, A. tragacanthus). Some pale-flowered vetches are similar in appearance, but vetches are more vine-like.

Biotechnology firms are working on deriving a telomerase activator from Astragalus. The chemical constituent cycloastragenol (also called TAT2) is being studied to help combat HIV, as well as infections associated with chronic diseases or aging.[8] However, the National Institutes of Health states: “The evidence for using astragalus for any health condition is limited. High-quality clinical trials (studies in people) are generally lacking. There is some preliminary evidence to suggest that astragalus, either alone or in combination with other herbs, may have potential benefits for the immune system, heart, and liver, and as an adjunctive therapy for cancer”.[9]

Research at the UCLA AIDS Institute focused on the function of cycloastragenol in the aging process of immune cells, and its effects on the cells’ response to viral infections. It appears to increase the production of telomerase, an enzyme that mediates the replacement of short bits of DNA known as telomeres, which play a key role in cell replication, including in cancer processes.[10]

Extracts of Astragalus propinquus ( syn. A. membranaceus) are marketed as life-prolonging extracts for human use. A proprietary extract of the dried root of A. membranaceus, called TA-65, “was associated with a significant age-reversal effect in the immune system, in that it led to declines in the percentage of senescent cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells after six to twelve months of use”.[11] There are mixed data regarding Astragalus, its effects on telomerase, and cancer. For example, although 80% of cancer cells utilize telomerase for their proliferation—a factor that might theoretically be exacerbated by Astragalus—the shortening of telomeres (resulting from such factors as stress and aging and possible contributors to malignancy), might also be mitigated by Astragalus. Thus, short telomeres result in chromosome instability, and the potential for telomere lengthening as a protection against cancer is possible.[12] Additionally, scientists recently reported that cancer cells may proliferate precisely because of the lack of differentiation occurring via damaged or shortened telomere length. They propose that “forced” elongation of telomeres promotes the differentiation of cancer cells, probably reducing malignancy, which is strongly associated with a loss of cell differentiation.

Borrego_Milkvetch_up_close

precision farming techniques

starting from this news –

BOCA RATON, Fla.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–February 24, 2016–

Zero Gravity Solutions, Inc.’s (ZGSI or the Company) (Pink Sheets: ZGSI), an agricultural biotechnology public company commercializing its technology derived from and designed for Space with significant applications on Earth, has previously announced the notification of approval for BAM-FX by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). The Company today was issued U.S. Patent No. 9,266,785 for BAM-FX.

BAM-FX is the first formulation of a family of BAM (Bio Available Minerals) products designed to increase crop yields and quality while also addressing –

  • crop plant mineral deficiencies and the stress related challenges facing agriculture worldwide.  Major problems facing agriculture include population growth and the hidden hunger of humans on our planet, known globally as crop mineral deficiencies in (zinc, selenium, iron and iodine), and coping with the now common weather events resulting in excessive heat and drought, frost and wind damage. Furthermore, soil degradation caused by excessive use of chemicals/fertilizers and subsequent damage to aquifers and water bodies caused by run-off can all be potentially mitigated by adopting the use of Precision Agricultural micronutrient products such as BAM-FX that help increase the efficiencies of fertilizer use.

 

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

this lovely novel, recommended by a lovely friend, tells an interesting story that we all will have to share eventually. make this a start of a new kind of farming, a farming of not just fresh produce but also a farm of fresh mind. thank you dear, for your great inspiration.

here is the story according to wiki –

Harold Fry, 65, has cut the lawn outside his home at Kingsbridge on the south coast of Devon when he receives a letter. A colleague of twenty years ago, Queenie Hennessy, has cancer and is in a hospice in Berwick-upon-Tweed. The doctors say there is nothing more that can be done for her. He writes her a feeble and brief note and goes to post it, has second thoughts, and walks to the next post box, and the next. He phones the hospice from a call box and leaves a message. He is coming and she should wait, stay alive while he makes the journey. A girl at the petrol filling station where he stops for a snack says something that acts as a catalyst for his nascent project. He tells her he is on foot, posting a letter to someone with cancer. ‘If you have faith you can do anything’[4] she replies, but quickly disclaims any religious reference.

As he begins the walk which in 87 days will cover 627 miles, he reflects. About his marriage, his former employment as a brewery representative, about his son David, from whom he is almost completely estranged. From stopping places he sends postcards, to his wife Maureen, to Queenie, and to the unnamed girl at the filling station who gave him inspiration for his journey.

Maureen, although anxious about him, for a long time doesn’t think of driving to provide help. Much later, when he has reached Yorkshire she drives up to see him. She thinks of joining his pilgrimage, but when he invites her she refuses, saying “It was selfish of me to ask you to give up your walk. Forgive me, Harold”, to which replies, “I’m the one who needs forgiveness” (232).

Harold also realises that his journey to Queenie Hennesy is also a way for him to resolve issues from his past and to listen to the problems of others, such as a “silver-haired gentleman” whom he meets in a cafe early in his journey, or a middle-aged woman with cuts on her wrists.

He remembers how when he was twelve his mother ‘walked out’, and is aware that he is repeating her action. When he was sixteen his father ‘showed him the door’. Later he went mad.

Six miles south of Stroud he phones the hospice and is told that the stay, cure, or miracle is working. His decision to walk appears vindicated. He finds a cast-off sleeping bag and carries it with another bag, looking now every bit a gentleman of the road. Faced with a shrunken bank balance he starts to sleep out. In Cheltenham he gives away his guidebook and posts home his debit card and other items. In the renunciation is the wonder of the impossible.

South of Coventry he is joined by a young man, Mick, who remarks, “What you’re doing is a pilgrimage for the twenty-first century. It’s awesome. Yours is the kind of story people want to hear” (193). Mick, it appears, works for the Coventry Telegraph, and Harold’s story of modern pilgrimage was soon everywhere, including Thought for the Day on BBC Radio 4. Before long they are joined by countless others from all walks of life. They do not use paid accommodation, always sleeping out or finding garden sheds.

There are disagreements, thefts, and soon Harold is thinking, “if only these people would go. Would find something else to believe in”(220). He decides to backtrack, which has the effect of throwing off the fellow-travellers who proceed directly to the Berwick destination. In the last stages of his walk Harold becomes badly disorientated, wanders around west of Berwick, sending home postcards from places like Kelso.

But when he at last reaches the hospice where Queenie has been waiting, he decides not to go in, and the reader is told, by means of a confessional letter to the girl at the filling station, of another motive for the walk. His son David, unemployed after Cambridge and addicted to drink and drugs, committed suicide in the garden shed, where he was discovered by the father with whom he barely ever communicated, and whose life is now a protracted mourning. The same letter divulges that when he and Queenie were working as colleagues she had taken the blame for a misdemeanour committed by Harold. “I let her take the blame”(264).

Finally, Harold changes his mind and goes to the sick room to find Queenie unable to speak and at the point of death. Maureen reaches him in Berwick, and he tells her that Queenie is beyond hope, beyond speech, and had been so since he set out. He however is able to say things to Maureen that were previously unspoken, about memories of David, of their earlier life, his own mother. They are reconciled before the waves breaking on the beach. Together they visit the hospice where Queenie has died and learned that she died at peace. When a young nun invites them to stay for evening mass they decline. Later, they head to the waterfront and reminisce on how they first met and laughed for the first time in years.

Controlled-environment agriculture (CEA)

Controlled-environment agriculture (CEA) is a technology-based approach toward food production. The aim of CEA is to provide protection and maintain optimal growing conditions throughout the development of the crop. Production takes place within an enclosed growing structure such as a greenhouse or building. Plants are often grown using hydroponic methods in order to supply the proper amounts of water and nutrients to the root zone. CEA optimizes the use of resources such as water, energy, space, capital and labor. CEA technologies include hydroponics, aquaculture, and aquaponics.[1]

Controllable variables:

CEA facilities can range from fully automated glasshouses with computer controls for watering, lighting and ventilation, to low-tech solutions such as cloches or plastic film on field grown crops and plastic-covered tunnels.[2]

CEA is used in research so that a specific aspect of production can be isolated while all other variables remain the same. Tinted glass could be compared to plain glass in this way during an investigation into photosynthesis.[3] Another possibility would be an investigation into the use of supplementary lighting for growing lettuce under a hydroponic system.[4]

A February 2011 article in the magazine Science Illustrated states, “In commercial agriculture, CEA can increase efficiency, reduce pests and diseases, and save resources. … Replicating a conventional farm with computers and LED lights is expensive but proves cost-efficient in the long run by producing up to 20 times as much high-end, pesticidee-free produce as a similar-size plot of soil. Fourteen thousand square feet of closely monitored plants produce 15 million seedlings annually at the solar-powered factory. Such factories will be necessary to meet urban China’s rising demand for quality fruits and vegetables.”[5]

BIOS-3 ad its comparison to ohfarm greenhouse

BIOS-3 is a closed ecosystem at the Institute of Biophysics in Krasnoyarsk, Russia.

Its construction began in 1965, and was completed in 1972. BIOS-3 consists of a 315 m3 habitat suitable for up to three persons, and was initially used for developing closed ecosystems capable of supporting humans. (this is similar to the size of the ohfarm greenhouse, which is 10*10*3, designed for 1-3 people to live within)

It was divided into 4 compartments — one of which is a crew area. Initially one other compartment was an algal cultivator, and the other two ‘phytrons’ for growing wheat or vegetables. Later the algal cultivator was converted into a third phytron. A level of light comparable to sunlight was supplied in each of the 4 compartments by 20 kW xenon lamps, cooled by water jackets. The facility used 400 kW of electricity, supplied by a nearby hydroelectric power station. (here the ohfaram is quite different from the bios-3 –

  • ohfarm uses much less overall power;
  • it uses other mechanisms for oxygen an co2 balance, with one to three men inside as part of the system
  • total power for sunlight replacement is similar;
  • )

Chlorella algae were used to recycle air breathed by humans, absorbing carbon dioxide and replenishing it with oxygen through photosynthesis. The algae were cultivated in stacked tanks under artificial light. To achieve a balance of oxygen and carbon dioxide, one human needed 8 m2 of exposed Chlorella. Air was purified of more complex organic compounds by heating to 600 °C in the presence of a catalyst. Water and nutrients were stored in advance and were also recycled. By 1968, system efficiency had reached 85% by recycling water. Dried meat was imported into the facility, and urine and feces were generally dried and stored, rather than being recycled.

BIOS-3

BIOS-3 is a closed ecosystem at the Institute of Biophysics in Krasnoyarsk, Russia.

Its construction began in 1965, and was completed in 1972. BIOS-3 consists of a 315 m3 habitat suitable for up to three persons, and was initially used for developing closed ecosystems capable of supporting humans. It was divided into 4 compartments — one of which is a crew area. Initially one other compartment was an algal cultivator, and the other two ‘phytrons’ for growing wheat or vegetables. Later the algal cultivator was converted into a third phytron. A level of light comparable to sunlight was supplied in each of the 4 compartments by 20 kW xenon lamps, cooled by water jackets. The facility used 400 kW of electricity, supplied by a nearby hydroelectric power station.

Chlorella algae were used to recycle air breathed by humans, absorbing carbon dioxide and replenishing it with oxygen through photosynthesis. The algae were cultivated in stacked tanks under artificial light. To achieve a balance of oxygen and carbon dioxide, one human needed 8 m2 of exposed Chlorella. Air was purified of more complex organic compounds by heating to 600 °C in the presence of a catalyst. Water and nutrients were stored in advance and were also recycled. By 1968, system efficiency had reached 85% by recycling water. Dried meat was imported into the facility, and urine and feces were generally dried and stored, rather than being recycled.

BIOS-3 facilities were used to conduct 10 manned closure experiments with a one to three man crew. The longest experiment with a three-man crew lasted 180 days (in 1972-1973). The facilities were used for the tests at least until 1984.

In 1991, BIOS-3 became a part of the International Center for Closed Ecosystems, which was formed as a subdivision of Institute of Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch. Closed ecosystems research focusing on growing plants and recycling waste was resumed in 2005 in cooperation with European Space Agency.

Biosphere 2

Biosphere 2 is an Earth systems science research facility located in Oracle, Arizona. It has been owned by the University of Arizona since 2011. Its mission is to serve as a center for research, outreach, teaching, and lifelong learning about Earth, its living systems, and its place in the universe. It is a 3.14-acre (1.27-hectare)[1] structure originally built to be an artificial, materially closed ecological system, or vivarium. It remains the largest closed system ever created.[2]

Biosphere 2 was originally meant to explore the web of interactions within life systems in a structure with five areas based on biomes, and an agricultural area and human living and working space to study the interactions between humans, farming, and technology with the rest of nature. It also explored the use of closed biospheres in space colonization, and allowed the study and manipulation of a biosphere without harming Earth’s. Its five biome areas were a 1,900 square meter rainforest, an 850 square meter ocean with a coral reef, a 450 square meter mangrove wetlands, a 1,300 square meter savannah grassland, a 1,400 square meter fog desert, a 2,500 square meter agricultural system, a human habitat, and a below-ground infrastructure. Heating and cooling water circulated through independent piping systems and passive solar input through the glass space frame panels covering most of the facility, and electrical power was supplied into Biosphere 2 from an onsite natural gas energy center.[3]

Biosphere 2 was only used twice for its original intended purposes as a closed-system experiment: once from 1991 to 1993, and the second time from March to September 1994. Both attempts, though heavily publicized, ran into problems including low amounts of food and oxygen, die-offs of many animal and plant species, squabbling among the resident scientists and management issues.

In June 1994, during the middle of the second experiment, Space Biosphere Ventures dissolved, and the structure was left in limbo. It was purchased in 1995 by Columbia University, who used it to run experiments until 2005. It then looked in danger of being demolished to make way for housing and retail stores, but was taken over for research by the University of Arizona in 2007; the University of Arizona assumed full ownership of the structure in 2011.